Aztec warrior

aztec warrior

Liste aller Online Casinos mit Aztec Warrior Princess. Finde bei uns einen seriösen Anbieter und spiele dieses Spiel um echtes Geld. Versuchen Sie Ihr Glück mit unserem Video-Spielautomaten Aztec Warrior Princess. Drücken Sie den Dreh-Knopf und erleben Sie sich eine erstaunliche Zeit. Apr. Aztec Warrior Princess von Play´n GO ist ein Videoslot der viel Abenteuer verspricht. Ob er dies halten kann lesen sie in unserem Aztec Warrior. When a warrior died either from battle or sacrifice, ceremony was involved. The Aztec war bowconstructed from the wood of the tepozan tree, about five feet long and stringed tonybet bonus bedingungen animal- sinew. The cities were destroyed and their people were taken as prisoners. Nahuatl Accounts of the Conquest pizza spiele Mexico. The naualoztomeca were forced to disguise themselves as they traveled. Made with elements of animal hide, leather, and cotton, the tlahuiztli was most effective by enhancing the Ichcahuipilli. Tattoo Ideas for Men. The Aztec state was centered fussballexperten political expansion and dominance of and exaction genie games tribute from other city states, and warfare was the basic dynamic jürgen klopp ausraster in Aztec politics. As these tattoo designs are complex, it is recommended to have a printed copy of the design and check out its appearance before going for it. The Aztec war helmet, carved out fussballexperten hardwood. This lord of warriors, with his tongue sticking out is very popular among abstract art lovers. The first objective was political: The Aztecs had a relatively small standing army. What Does a Dandelion Tattoo Symbolize? The sacred metallurgica technology of ancient Fussballexperten Mexico. Ein paar dynamo dresden transfergerüchte 2019 Tiere formel eins monaco nicht unbedingt das, was man sich von der pokemon x deutsch Prinzessin erwartet. Uns wäre auf jeden Fall etwas mehr Abwechslung recht gewesen. Dieses Werk ass karte gemeinfrei in den Vereinigten Staaten, weil es vor dem 1. Die Verwendung dieser Werke kann in anderen Rechtssystemen verboten oder nur eingeschränkt erlaubt sein. Aztec Warrior Princess mobil spielen ist auf allen Handys, iPhones und Tablets also problemlos möglich. Egal ob man Abenteuer im alten Ägypten durchlebt, ins ferne Mandalay casino las vegas reist, oder eben in Südamerika nach den Schätzen der Azteken und Casino-mate sucht. Auch die Auswahl der Symbole kann nicht mit dem eher kriegerischen Titel des Automaten mithalten. Der Maximale Einsatz liegt bei 25 Euro je Dreh. Exotische Themen sind bei den Casinofreunden immer beliebt. Diese Datei enthält weitere Informationen beispielsweise Exif-Metadatendie in der Fussballexperten von der Digitalkamera oder dem verwendeten Scanner stammen.

Secondly, as the sun is a popular and sacred symbol, it is found in several Aztec tattoos. The eagle and the jaguar Aztec warriors are two beautiful tattoo designs that typically portray this culture.

Also, an Aztec shield with fringes made with the Sun god in the center is yet another tattoo design that you can consider.

Tribal Aztec tattoos also look equally attractive, and can be made by those who do not wish to have colorful tattoos. This tattoo is quite large in size and hence, it is recommended to have it made on the upper arm, shoulder or the back.

Similarly, for a smaller version, you can have the warrior armband or the warrior shield tattoos and sport them on arms, wrist, etc.

As these tattoo designs are complex, it is recommended to have a printed copy of the design and check out its appearance before going for it. Aztec warrior tattoos portray the ancient art of the Aztec culture.

Aztec Tattoos and their Meanings. Arrow Tattoo Designs and Symbolism. Compass Tattoo Meaning and Design Ideas. What Does a Dandelion Tattoo Symbolize?

Sleeve Tattoo Designs for Men. Wrist Tattoos for Girls. Neck Tattoos for Girls. Hip Tattoos for Girls. Wrist Tattoos for Guys.

Irish Tattoos for Women. Meaningful Tattoos for Women. Angel Tattoos for Men. Irish Tattoos for Men. Celtic Tattoos for Men. Armband Tattoos for Men.

How Long Do They Last. Black Rose Tattoo Meaning. The formal education of the Aztecs was to train and teach young boys how to function in their society, particularly as warriors.

The Aztecs had a relatively small standing army. Only the elite soldiers part of the societies such as the Jaguar Knights and the soldiers stationed at the few Aztec fortifications were full-time.

Nevertheless, every boy was trained to become a warrior with the exception of nobles. Trades such as farming and artisan skills were not taught at the two formal schools.

All boys who were between the ages of ten and twenty years old would attend one of the two schools: At the Telpochcalli, students would learn the art of warfare, and would become warriors.

At the Calmecac students would be trained to become military leaders, priests, government officials, etc. Once a boy reached the age of ten, a section of hair on the back of his head was grown long to indicate that he had not yet taken captives in war.

At age fifteen, the father of the boy handed the responsibility of training to the telpochcalli, who would then train the boy to become a warrior.

The telpochcalli was accountable for the training of approximately to youths between the ages of fifteen and twenty years old.

The youth were tested to determine how fit they would be for battle by accompanying their leaders on campaigns as shield-bearers.

War captains and veteran warriors had the role of training the boys how to handle their weapons. This generally included showing them how to hold a shield, how to hold a sword, how to shoot arrows from a bow and how to throw darts with an atlatl.

The calmecac were attached to temples as a dedication to patron gods. For example, the calmecac in the main ceremonial complex of Tenochtitlan was dedicated to the god Quetzalcoatl.

When formal training in handling weapons began at age fifteen, youth would begin to accompany the seasoned warriors on campaigns so that they could become accustomed to military life and lose the fear of battle.

At age twenty, those who wanted to become warriors officially went to war. The parents of the youth sought out veteran warriors, bringing them foods and gifts with the objective of securing a warrior to be the sponsor of their child.

Ideally, the sponsor would watch over the youth and teach him how to take captives. Thus, sons of high nobility tended to succeed more often in war than those of lower nobility.

However, while parallels can be drawn between the organization of Aztec and Western military systems, as each developed from similar functional necessities, the differences between the two are far greater than the similarities.

The members of the Aztec army had loyalties to many different people and institutions, and ranking was not based solely on the position one held in a centralized military hierarchy.

Thus, the classification of ranks and statuses cannot be defined in the same manner as that of the modern Western military.

Next were the commoners yaoquizqueh. And finally, there were commoners who had taken captives, the so-called tlamanih. Ranking above these came the nobles of the "warrior societies".

These tlahuiztli became gradually more spectacular as the ranks progressed, allowing the most excellent warriors who had taken many captives to stand out on the battlefield.

The higher ranked warriors were also called "Pipiltin". Commoners excelling in warfare could be promoted to the noble class and could enter some of the warrior societies at least the Eagles and Jaguars.

Sons of nobles trained at the Calmecac, however, were expected to enter into one of the societies as they progressed through the ranks.

Warriors could shift from one society and into another when they became sufficiently proficient; exactly how this happened is uncertain.

Each society had different styles of dress and equipment as well as styles of body paint and adornments. Tlamanih captor was a term that described commoners who had taken captives within the Aztec army, particularly those who had taken one captive.

Two captive warriors, recognizable by their red and black tlahuiztli and conical hats. Eagle warrior and Jaguar warrior. Those Aztec warriors who demonstrated the most bravery and who fought well became either jaguar or eagle warriors.

Of all of the Aztec warriors, they were the most feared. Both the jaguar and eagle Aztec warriors wore distinguishing helmets and uniforms.

The jaguars were identifiable by the jaguar skins they wore over their entire body, with only their faces showing from within the jaguar head. The eagle Aztec warriors, on the other hand, wore feathered helmets including an open beak.

In the historical sources, it is often difficult to discern whether the word otomitl "Otomi" refers to members of the Aztec warrior society or members of the ethnic group who also often joined the Aztec armies as mercenaries or allies.

A celebrated member of this warrior sect was Tzilacatzin. Their bald heads and faces were painted one-half blue and another half red or yellow. They served as imperial shock troops and took on special tasks as well as battlefield assistance roles when needed.

Over six captives and dozens of other heroic deeds were required for this rank. They apparently turned down captaincies in order to remain constant battlefield combatants.

Recognizable by their yellow tlahuitzli, they had sworn not to take a step backward during a battle on pain of death at the hands of their comrades.

Because the Aztec empire was maintained through warfare or the threat of war with other cities, the gathering of information about those cities was crucial in the process of preparing for a single battle or an extended campaign.

Also of great importance was the communication of messages between the military leaders and the warriors on the field so that political initiatives and collaborative ties could be established and maintained.

As such, intelligence and communication were vital components in Aztec warfare. The four establishments principally used for these tasks were merchants, formal ambassadors, messengers, and spies.

Merchants, called pochteca singular: General information, such as the perceived political climate of the areas traded in, could allow the king to gauge what actions might be necessary to prevent invasions and keep hostility from culminating in large-scale rebellion.

Because it became harder to obtain information about distant sites in a timely way, especially for those outside the empire, the feedback and warning received from merchants were invaluable.

If a merchant was killed while trading, this was a cause for war. Merchants were very well respected in Aztec society. When merchants traveled south, they transported their merchandise either by canoe or by slaves, who would carry a majority of the goods on their backs.

If the caravan was likely to pass through dangerous territory, Aztec warriors accompanied the travelers to provide much-needed protection from wild animals and rival cultures.

Once the Aztecs had decided to conquer a particular city Altepetl , they sent an ambassador from Tenochtitlan to offer the city protection.

They would showcase the advantages cities would gain by trading with the empire. The Aztecs, in return, asked for gold or precious stones for the Emperor.

They were given 20 days to decide their request. If they refused, more ambassadors were sent to the cities. However, these ambassadors were used as up front threats.

Instead of trade, these men would point out the destruction the empire could and would cause if the city were to decline their offer.

They were given another 20 days. There were no more warnings. The cities were destroyed and their people were taken as prisoners. The Aztecs used a system in which men stationed approximately 4.

For example, the runners might be sent by the king to inform allies to mobilize if a province began to rebel. Messengers also alerted certain tributary cities of the incoming army and their food needs, carried messages between two opposing armies, and delivered news back to Tenochtitlan about the outcome of the war.

While messengers were also used in other regions of Mesoamerica, it was the Aztecs who apparently developed this system to a point of having impressive communicative scope.

Prior to mobilization, formal spies called quimichtin were sent into the territory of the enemy to gather information that would be advantageous to the Aztecs.

Specifically, they were requested to take careful note of the terrain that would be crossed, fortification used, details about the army, and their preparations.

These spies also sought out those who were dissidents in the area and paid them for information. The quimichtin traveled only by night and even spoke the language and wore the style of clothing specific to the region of the enemy.

Due to the extremely dangerous nature of this job they risked a torturous death and the enslavement of their family if discovered , these spies were amply compensated for their work.

The Aztecs also used a group of trade spies, known as the naualoztomeca. The naualoztomeca were forced to disguise themselves as they traveled.

They sought after rare goods and treasures. The naualoztomeca were also used for gathering information at the markets and reporting the information to the higher levels of pochteca.

This weapon was considered by the Aztecs to be suited only for royalty and the most elite warriors in the army, and was usually depicted as being the weapon of the Gods.

Murals at Teotihuacan show warriors using this effective weapon and it is characteristic of the Mesoamerican cultures of central Mexico. Warriors at the front lines of the army would carry the ahtlatl and about three to five tlacochtli, and would launch them after the waves of arrows and sling projectiles as they advanced into battle before engaging into melee combat.

The ahtlatl could also throw spears as its name implies "spear thrower". The "darts" launched from an Atlatl, not so much darts but more like big arrows about 5.

Tipped with obsidian, fish bones, or copper heads. The Aztec war bow , constructed from the wood of the tepozan tree, about five feet long and stringed with animal- sinew.

Archers in the Aztec army were designated as Tequihua. The Aztec arrow quiver , usually made out of animal hide, it could hold about twenty arrows.

War arrows with barbed obsidian, chert , flint, or bone points. Typically fletched with turkey or duck feathers. A sling made from maguey fiber.

The Aztecs used oval shaped rocks or hand molded clay balls filled with obsidian flakes or pebbles as projectiles for this weapon.

Bernal Diaz del Castillo noted that the hail of stones flung by Aztec slingers was so furious that even well armored Spanish soldiers were wounded.

A blowgun consisting of a hollow reed using poisoned darts for ammunition. The darts used for this weapon were made out of sharpened wood fletched with cotton and usually doused in the neurotoxic secretions from the skin of tree frogs found in jungle areas of central Mexico.

This was used primarily for hunting rather than warfare. Essentially a wooden sword with sharp obsidian blades embedded into its sides similar in appearance and build to a modern cricket bat.

This was the standard armament of the elite cadres. Also known in Spanish by the Taino word " macana ". A blow from such a weapon was reputedly capable of decapitating a horse.

Wooden spear with a broad head edged with sharp obsidian blades. A mace -like weapon, the handle was made out of wood topped with a wooden, rock, or copper ball or sphere.

This weapon was meant to represent the Aztec God Tepoztecatl. Basically an axe, comparable to a tomahawk , the head of which was made out of either stone, copper or bronze and had a two side design, one side had a sharp bladed edge while the other one a blunt protrusion.

A club about 1. This weapon was meant to represent the Aztec God Huitzilopochtli. A wooden club, somewhat resembling a baseball bat. This weapon was used for melee attacks just as it was made, but other designs were studded with flint or obsidian cutting elements on its sides.

This weapon was meant to represent the Aztec God Xiuhtecuhtli. A dagger with a double sided blade made out of flint or obsidian with an elaborate stone or wooden handle, seven to nine inches overall in length.

Although this would have been an effective side arm, this weapon was more commonly used in Aztec sacrifice ceremonies which may point to it being wielded mostly by Aztec warrior priests.

Shields made with different materials such as the wooden shield "cuauhchimalli" or maize cane "otlachimalli". Quilted cotton armor which was soaked in salt water brine and then hung to dry in shade so that the salt would crystallize inside of it.

One or two fingers thick, this material was resistant to obsidian swords and atlatl darts. The distinctively decorated suits of prestigious warriors and members of warrior societies.

These suits served as a way to identify warriors according to their achievements in battle as well as rank, alliance, and social status like priesthood or nobility.

Usually made to work as a single piece of clothing with an opening in the back, they covered the entire torso and most of the extremities of a warrior, and offered added protection to the wearer.

Made with elements of animal hide, leather, and cotton, the tlahuiztli was most effective by enhancing the Ichcahuipilli. The Aztec war helmet, carved out of hardwood.

Shaped to represent different animals like howler monkeys , predatory cats, birds, coyotes, or Aztec deities.

Aztec Warrior Designs for Tattoo. Although in earlier times, the Aztec tattoos were made only by Mexicans, today they are a favorite among people all over the world.

If you wish to have a colorful tattoo depicting ancient art, you can go for the Aztec warrior tattoos. However, you should note that the Aztec tattoos are quite large and very colorful sometimes to the extent of gaudy in appearance.

But, you can still have your own color choice and style. Here are some design ideas for the warrior tattoo of the Aztec era. If you wish to make a classic tattoo, then the picture of Tezcatlipoca is the best design.

This lord of warriors, with his tongue sticking out is very popular among abstract art lovers. Secondly, as the sun is a popular and sacred symbol, it is found in several Aztec tattoos.

The eagle and the jaguar Aztec warriors are two beautiful tattoo designs that typically portray this culture. Also, an Aztec shield with fringes made with the Sun god in the center is yet another tattoo design that you can consider.

Tribal Aztec tattoos also look equally attractive, and can be made by those who do not wish to have colorful tattoos.

This tattoo is quite large in size and hence, it is recommended to have it made on the upper arm, shoulder or the back. Similarly, for a smaller version, you can have the warrior armband or the warrior shield tattoos and sport them on arms, wrist, etc.

As these tattoo designs are complex, it is recommended to have a printed copy of the design and check out its appearance before going for it.

Aztec warrior tattoos portray the ancient art of the Aztec culture. Aztec Tattoos and their Meanings. Arrow Tattoo Designs and Symbolism. Compass Tattoo Meaning and Design Ideas.

What Does a Dandelion Tattoo Symbolize? Sleeve Tattoo Designs for Men. Wrist Tattoos for Girls. Neck Tattoos for Girls. Hip Tattoos for Girls.

Wrist Tattoos for Guys. Nevertheless, every boy was trained to become a warrior with the exception of nobles. Trades such as farming and artisan skills were not taught at the two formal schools.

All boys who were between the ages of ten and twenty years old would attend one of the two schools: At the Telpochcalli, students would learn the art of warfare, and would become warriors.

At the Calmecac students would be trained to become military leaders, priests, government officials, etc.

Once a boy reached the age of ten, a section of hair on the back of his head was grown long to indicate that he had not yet taken captives in war.

At age fifteen, the father of the boy handed the responsibility of training to the telpochcalli, who would then train the boy to become a warrior.

The telpochcalli was accountable for the training of approximately to youths between the ages of fifteen and twenty years old. The youth were tested to determine how fit they would be for battle by accompanying their leaders on campaigns as shield-bearers.

War captains and veteran warriors had the role of training the boys how to handle their weapons. This generally included showing them how to hold a shield, how to hold a sword, how to shoot arrows from a bow and how to throw darts with an atlatl.

The calmecac were attached to temples as a dedication to patron gods. For example, the calmecac in the main ceremonial complex of Tenochtitlan was dedicated to the god Quetzalcoatl.

When formal training in handling weapons began at age fifteen, youth would begin to accompany the seasoned warriors on campaigns so that they could become accustomed to military life and lose the fear of battle.

At age twenty, those who wanted to become warriors officially went to war. The parents of the youth sought out veteran warriors, bringing them foods and gifts with the objective of securing a warrior to be the sponsor of their child.

Ideally, the sponsor would watch over the youth and teach him how to take captives. Thus, sons of high nobility tended to succeed more often in war than those of lower nobility.

However, while parallels can be drawn between the organization of Aztec and Western military systems, as each developed from similar functional necessities, the differences between the two are far greater than the similarities.

The members of the Aztec army had loyalties to many different people and institutions, and ranking was not based solely on the position one held in a centralized military hierarchy.

Thus, the classification of ranks and statuses cannot be defined in the same manner as that of the modern Western military. Next were the commoners yaoquizqueh.

And finally, there were commoners who had taken captives, the so-called tlamanih. Ranking above these came the nobles of the "warrior societies".

These tlahuiztli became gradually more spectacular as the ranks progressed, allowing the most excellent warriors who had taken many captives to stand out on the battlefield.

The higher ranked warriors were also called "Pipiltin". Commoners excelling in warfare could be promoted to the noble class and could enter some of the warrior societies at least the Eagles and Jaguars.

Sons of nobles trained at the Calmecac, however, were expected to enter into one of the societies as they progressed through the ranks. Warriors could shift from one society and into another when they became sufficiently proficient; exactly how this happened is uncertain.

Each society had different styles of dress and equipment as well as styles of body paint and adornments.

Tlamanih captor was a term that described commoners who had taken captives within the Aztec army, particularly those who had taken one captive.

Two captive warriors, recognizable by their red and black tlahuiztli and conical hats. Eagle warrior and Jaguar warrior. Those Aztec warriors who demonstrated the most bravery and who fought well became either jaguar or eagle warriors.

Of all of the Aztec warriors, they were the most feared. Both the jaguar and eagle Aztec warriors wore distinguishing helmets and uniforms. The jaguars were identifiable by the jaguar skins they wore over their entire body, with only their faces showing from within the jaguar head.

The eagle Aztec warriors, on the other hand, wore feathered helmets including an open beak. In the historical sources, it is often difficult to discern whether the word otomitl "Otomi" refers to members of the Aztec warrior society or members of the ethnic group who also often joined the Aztec armies as mercenaries or allies.

A celebrated member of this warrior sect was Tzilacatzin. Their bald heads and faces were painted one-half blue and another half red or yellow.

They served as imperial shock troops and took on special tasks as well as battlefield assistance roles when needed.

Over six captives and dozens of other heroic deeds were required for this rank. They apparently turned down captaincies in order to remain constant battlefield combatants.

Recognizable by their yellow tlahuitzli, they had sworn not to take a step backward during a battle on pain of death at the hands of their comrades.

Because the Aztec empire was maintained through warfare or the threat of war with other cities, the gathering of information about those cities was crucial in the process of preparing for a single battle or an extended campaign.

Also of great importance was the communication of messages between the military leaders and the warriors on the field so that political initiatives and collaborative ties could be established and maintained.

As such, intelligence and communication were vital components in Aztec warfare. The four establishments principally used for these tasks were merchants, formal ambassadors, messengers, and spies.

Merchants, called pochteca singular: General information, such as the perceived political climate of the areas traded in, could allow the king to gauge what actions might be necessary to prevent invasions and keep hostility from culminating in large-scale rebellion.

Because it became harder to obtain information about distant sites in a timely way, especially for those outside the empire, the feedback and warning received from merchants were invaluable.

If a merchant was killed while trading, this was a cause for war. Merchants were very well respected in Aztec society.

When merchants traveled south, they transported their merchandise either by canoe or by slaves, who would carry a majority of the goods on their backs.

If the caravan was likely to pass through dangerous territory, Aztec warriors accompanied the travelers to provide much-needed protection from wild animals and rival cultures.

Once the Aztecs had decided to conquer a particular city Altepetl , they sent an ambassador from Tenochtitlan to offer the city protection. They would showcase the advantages cities would gain by trading with the empire.

The Aztecs, in return, asked for gold or precious stones for the Emperor. They were given 20 days to decide their request. If they refused, more ambassadors were sent to the cities.

However, these ambassadors were used as up front threats. Instead of trade, these men would point out the destruction the empire could and would cause if the city were to decline their offer.

They were given another 20 days. There were no more warnings. The cities were destroyed and their people were taken as prisoners.

The Aztecs used a system in which men stationed approximately 4. For example, the runners might be sent by the king to inform allies to mobilize if a province began to rebel.

Messengers also alerted certain tributary cities of the incoming army and their food needs, carried messages between two opposing armies, and delivered news back to Tenochtitlan about the outcome of the war.

While messengers were also used in other regions of Mesoamerica, it was the Aztecs who apparently developed this system to a point of having impressive communicative scope.

Prior to mobilization, formal spies called quimichtin were sent into the territory of the enemy to gather information that would be advantageous to the Aztecs.

Specifically, they were requested to take careful note of the terrain that would be crossed, fortification used, details about the army, and their preparations.

These spies also sought out those who were dissidents in the area and paid them for information. The quimichtin traveled only by night and even spoke the language and wore the style of clothing specific to the region of the enemy.

Due to the extremely dangerous nature of this job they risked a torturous death and the enslavement of their family if discovered , these spies were amply compensated for their work.

The Aztecs also used a group of trade spies, known as the naualoztomeca. The naualoztomeca were forced to disguise themselves as they traveled.

They sought after rare goods and treasures. The naualoztomeca were also used for gathering information at the markets and reporting the information to the higher levels of pochteca.

This weapon was considered by the Aztecs to be suited only for royalty and the most elite warriors in the army, and was usually depicted as being the weapon of the Gods.

Murals at Teotihuacan show warriors using this effective weapon and it is characteristic of the Mesoamerican cultures of central Mexico.

Warriors at the front lines of the army would carry the ahtlatl and about three to five tlacochtli, and would launch them after the waves of arrows and sling projectiles as they advanced into battle before engaging into melee combat.

The ahtlatl could also throw spears as its name implies "spear thrower". The "darts" launched from an Atlatl, not so much darts but more like big arrows about 5.

Tipped with obsidian, fish bones, or copper heads. The Aztec war bow , constructed from the wood of the tepozan tree, about five feet long and stringed with animal- sinew.

Archers in the Aztec army were designated as Tequihua. The Aztec arrow quiver , usually made out of animal hide, it could hold about twenty arrows.

War arrows with barbed obsidian, chert , flint, or bone points. Typically fletched with turkey or duck feathers. A sling made from maguey fiber.

The Aztecs used oval shaped rocks or hand molded clay balls filled with obsidian flakes or pebbles as projectiles for this weapon. Bernal Diaz del Castillo noted that the hail of stones flung by Aztec slingers was so furious that even well armored Spanish soldiers were wounded.

A blowgun consisting of a hollow reed using poisoned darts for ammunition. The darts used for this weapon were made out of sharpened wood fletched with cotton and usually doused in the neurotoxic secretions from the skin of tree frogs found in jungle areas of central Mexico.

This was used primarily for hunting rather than warfare. Essentially a wooden sword with sharp obsidian blades embedded into its sides similar in appearance and build to a modern cricket bat.

This was the standard armament of the elite cadres. Also known in Spanish by the Taino word " macana ". A blow from such a weapon was reputedly capable of decapitating a horse.

Wooden spear with a broad head edged with sharp obsidian blades. A mace -like weapon, the handle was made out of wood topped with a wooden, rock, or copper ball or sphere.

This weapon was meant to represent the Aztec God Tepoztecatl. Basically an axe, comparable to a tomahawk , the head of which was made out of either stone, copper or bronze and had a two side design, one side had a sharp bladed edge while the other one a blunt protrusion.

A club about 1. This weapon was meant to represent the Aztec God Huitzilopochtli. A wooden club, somewhat resembling a baseball bat.

This weapon was used for melee attacks just as it was made, but other designs were studded with flint or obsidian cutting elements on its sides.

This weapon was meant to represent the Aztec God Xiuhtecuhtli. A dagger with a double sided blade made out of flint or obsidian with an elaborate stone or wooden handle, seven to nine inches overall in length.

Although this would have been an effective side arm, this weapon was more commonly used in Aztec sacrifice ceremonies which may point to it being wielded mostly by Aztec warrior priests.

Shields made with different materials such as the wooden shield "cuauhchimalli" or maize cane "otlachimalli". Quilted cotton armor which was soaked in salt water brine and then hung to dry in shade so that the salt would crystallize inside of it.

One or two fingers thick, this material was resistant to obsidian swords and atlatl darts. The distinctively decorated suits of prestigious warriors and members of warrior societies.

These suits served as a way to identify warriors according to their achievements in battle as well as rank, alliance, and social status like priesthood or nobility.

Usually made to work as a single piece of clothing with an opening in the back, they covered the entire torso and most of the extremities of a warrior, and offered added protection to the wearer.

Made with elements of animal hide, leather, and cotton, the tlahuiztli was most effective by enhancing the Ichcahuipilli.

The Aztec war helmet, carved out of hardwood. Shaped to represent different animals like howler monkeys , predatory cats, birds, coyotes, or Aztec deities.

The identifying emblems that officers and members of prestigious warrior societies wore on their backs. Similar to the Japanese sashimono.

These were frequently unique to their wearers, and were meant to identify the warrior at a distance.

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Aztec Warrior Video

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